Regional Arts NSW
Skip to content

South East Arts

South East Arts
32 Church St
Bega NSW 2550 Australia
PO Box 492
Bega NSW 2550
Phone 02 6492 0711
Website southeastarts.org.au

RADO Staff

Executive Director
Andrew Gray
Bega Office
Phone 02 6492 0711
Mobile 0429 909 447
Aboriginal Creative and Cultural Engagement Officer
Jasmin Williams
Phone 02 6492 0711
Mobile 0497 281 464
Communications Officer & Screen Industry Development Officer
Kate Howarth
Phone 02 6492 0711
Mobile 0447 006 913
Administration and Finance Officer
Allison Vandenbergh
Phone 02 6492 0711

RADO Directors

CHAIR
Bettina Richter
Co-opted Member
Deputy Chair
John Shumack
Snowy Monaro Regional Council Community Representative
Treasurer
Silas Dunstan
Secretary
Mandy Hillson
Co-opted Member
Public Officer
Andrew Gray
DIRECTOR
Trisha Dixon
Co-opted Member
DIRECTOR
Ian Campbell
Co- Opted Member
DIRECTOR
Lindsay Brown
Eurobadalla Shire Councillor
DIRECTOR
Cathy Griff
Bega Valley Shire Councillor
DIRECTOR
Rachel Choy
Co-Opted Member

Regional Snapshot

SOUTH EAST ARTS REGIONAL SNAPSHOT OVERVIEW 2014

OVERVIEW 

The South East covers an area of 62,200 square kilometres and a total population of approximately 87,381. The region has a strong history of original Aboriginal ownership and European settlement focused on fishing, farming and forestry. In comparison to other coastal regions in NSW, the South East has a small population spread over a large geographic area, with two-thirds of the region’s people living in the two coastal LGAs. National Parks and State Forests make up large areas of the region and there is a limited amount of rateable land.

The region as serviced by South East Arts comprises five LGAs:

  • Bega Valley Shire Council – 33,475 pop. (major towns – Bega, Merimbula and Eden)
  • Snowy Monaro Regional Council – 20,707 pop. (major towns – Bombala, Cooma, Jindabyne)
  • Eurobodalla Shire Council – 35,741 pop. (major towns – Batemans Bay, Moruya, Narooma)

Main industries and employers include:

  • Bega Cheese and associated dairy industry
  • Local councils
  • Tourism industry (includes coastal and snow ski tourism)
  • Hospitality industry
  • State and Federal government service centres
  • Southern Phone – telecommunications
  • Snowy Hydro Authority
  • Traditional agriculture and fisheries
  • Logging and associated timber production

Arts and Cultural Overview

The South East region has a high proportion of resident artists and high levels of participation in arts and cultural activities. Inspired by the beauty of the region, many professional visual artists, musicians and performing artists have made their homes here. Across the region there is an active network of community arts and cultural organisations (more concentrated on the coast) and a calendar of regionally-based music and cultural festivals. Music societies and arts councils support a limited touring program of professional musicians with a focus on classical music, and there are a number of amateur theatre groups with regular, well-attended performances. The commercial sector presents a range of mainly music-based live performances, supported by the summer and winter tourism markets.

Local Government

All councils have recently completed long-term Community Strategic Plans, with associated four-year Operational Plans. These strategic plans include a range of objectives that articulate the cultural aspirations of the community, providing South East Arts with clearer directions for service delivery to participating LGAs. A number of Councils have identified the potential of creative industries and cultural tourism as part of their economic and community development.

Currently, the local Council’s main cultural services expenditure is on the provision of library services. In recent years the libraries have extended their services to include a range of talks, presentations, performances, exhibitions and workshops. The Bega Valley Regional Gallery is the only council-supported regional gallery, employing a full-time curator. Only one Council in the region (Eurobodalla) employs a cultural development officer.

KEY ISSUES AND TRENDS

Performing Arts

The region boasts a number of small but nationally significant hubs of arts activity:

Bega-based youth dance theatre fLiNG Physical Theatre has a full-time professional artistic director and growing reputation nationally and internationally.

Bermagui’s Four Winds Festival (biennial) has grown over two decades to be recognised as one of the highlights of Australia’s musical calendar. Four Winds has garnered considerable government and philanthropic support to develop their performance space and facilities, as well as assisting in establishing Four Winds as a professional arts organisation.

One of the key issues for performing arts in the region continues to be the lack of purpose-built, professionally managed cultural centres or venues. The recently completed Four Winds Sound Shell in Bermagui and planned development of a cultural centre will be the first of its kind in the region.

Community and professional performances take place in a diverse range of venues including pubs, clubs, community halls, churches, school halls and libraries. The two coastal councils have embraced a more strategic approach to the development of cultural facilities, carrying out detailed research and needs analysis to ensure a sustainable model for future development.

There are a small number of youth-focused scholarship programs supporting music and performing arts, as well as high levels of participation at the secondary school level.

Eurobodalla Council has undertaken a detailed needs analysis for cultural infrastructure in the Shire and has a master plan for development of facilities in the three main centres of Bateman’s Bay, Moruya and Narooma.

Bega Valley Shire Council is developing a new Town Hall in Bega which has been financed by sale of commercial land and development. To be completed in 2014, the new venue will be available for performing arts activities; however it has not been designed specifically for this purpose.

Visual Arts

The visual arts are represented through various arts organisations, individual artists, commercial and cooperative galleries, and artist’s studio galleries. There are an increasing number of professional visual artists residing in the region, many of whom have national and international reputations. Initiatives such as the Far South Coast Living Artists Scholarship have aimed to provide financial support for professional artists. However, a lack of access to the arts markets of the main metropolitan areas and the impact of the recent global financial downturn is a major challenge for visual artists looking to develop and maintain a professional practice.

Local visual artists have the opportunity to exhibit in a number of small private commercial galleries and artist-run initiatives; however in recent years the number of available venues has decreased. There are local visual arts competitions open to artists in the region, including:

  • Lake Light Sculpture (Jindabyne)
  • Sculpture on the Edge (Bermagui)
  • Basil Seller’s Art Prize (Moruya)
  • Bega Art Prize (Bega)
  • Shirley Hannan National Portrait Award (Bega)

Visual arts workshops, seminars and master classes are a regular feature of the annual calendar of events; however the availability of tertiary (mainly TAFE) visual arts courses is declining in the region.

Festivals

Recent research by South East Arts identified 28 festivals with a significant arts and cultural component. The region has a number of signature arts festivals which celebrate the visual and performing arts, featuring local and visiting artists. Events such as the annual Merimbula Jazz Festival, Moruya Jazz Festival and Cobargo Folk Festival have a long history in the region with traditionally strong support from audiences.

More recently established festivals, such as the Candelo Village Festival (biennial) and Sculpture on the Edge (Bermagui) have built new audiences for contemporary music and sculpture respectively. Festivals strongly supported by local businesses are evident in the high country and include the Thredbo Jazz, Thredbo Blues and Peak Music (Perisher) Festivals. Most festivals rely heavily on volunteer workers to coordinate and manage these events, with insurance coverage, succession planning and financial sustainability key issues for many festivals.

Aboriginal Arts and Culture

The 2011 ABS Census data identified that there were 3,109 people within the region who identified as either Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. The Aboriginal population distribution throughout the region is dispersed, with larger pockets centred in Eurobodalla and Bega Valley Shires. Previous South East Arts projects have identified a considerable number of practising visual artists; however few operate at a professional level.

There are eight Local Aboriginal Lands Councils in the region, but no regional coordination or cooperative initiatives between them. There are two Aboriginal cultural centres in the region – Aboriginal Cultural Centre Monaroo Bobberrer Gudu at Jigamy and Umbarra Cultural Centre at Wallaga Lake, however the latter is currently not open for general public access. South East Arts recently completed an Aboriginal Arts and Cultural Action Plan to guide the organisation in development of initiatives in this area. South East Arts’ Aboriginal Arts and Cultural Action Plan guides the organisation in the development of initiatives. These include regional partnerships with Jigamy and the Bundian Way initiative, support of individual artists and employment of a part-time Aboriginal Creative and Cultural Engagement Officer.

Touring

There is limited touring of visual and performing arts in the region mainly due to the lack of professionally managed venues. The various music societies and art societies have annual programs that include mainly classical music performers, through Musica Viva and Co-Opera. Contemporary music touring is mainly through the various commercial clubs and some arts organisations (e.g. Candelo Arts Society). Theatre touring is largely non-existent; however South East Arts has been developing partnerships with Critical Stages, Merrigong Theatre (Wollongong) and Canberra-based companies and artists.

Current issues affecting the arts and cultural sector

  • High proportion of resident artists and high levels of participation in arts and cultural activities.
  • Active network of community arts and cultural organisations and a calendar of 28 regionally-based music and cultural festivals.
  • Developing music cultural hubs in Candelo (Candelo Arts Society) and Bermagui (Four Winds).
  • Small number of professional arts organisations – fLiNG Physical Theatre and Four Winds.
  • Commercial sector presents a range of mainly music-based live performances, supported by the summer and winter tourism markets.
  • Limited touring of visual and performing arts in the region mainly due to the lack of professionally managed venues.
  • Community and professional performances take place in a diverse range of venues including pubs, clubs, community halls, churches, school halls and libraries.
  • Local visual artists have the opportunity to exhibit in a number of small private commercial galleries, artist run initiatives and local markets.
  • Bega Valley Shire Council runs a regional gallery and employs the only professional curator in the region.
  • Most festivals rely heavily on volunteer workers to coordinate and manage events, with insurance coverage, succession planning and financial sustainability key issues.
  • Eight Local Aboriginal Lands Councils in the region, but no regional co-ordination or cooperative initiatives. Two Aboriginal cultural centres in the region at Eden and Wallaga Lake, however the latter is currently not open for general public access.
  • Limited creative industries development and opportunities.
  • An overall impediment to audience development is a small population spread over large geographical area and low socioeconomic area with limited rateable land for LGAs.

SWOT ANALYSIS

Strengths

  • Active participation in arts and cultural activities.
  • High level of volunteer support.
  • Professionally led youth dance with fLiNG Physical Theatre.
  • Four Winds organisation with professional arts manager.
  • All LGAs participating in Regional Arts Board and making financial contributions.
  • Music performance and development strongly supported.
  • Summer and winter cultural tourism opportunities for artists.
  • Growing strategic approach to development by councils and organisations.
  • Growing development of cultural tourism.
  • Long running and well supported festivals in the region.

Weaknesses

  • Small population over large geographical area.
  • Low socio-economic area with limited rateable land.
  • Limited cultural infrastructure.
  • Limited number of arts professionals.
  • Poor communication and networking in the arts across the region.
  • Lack of succession planning and strategic approach from arts organisations.
  • Limited creative industries development.
  • Lack of co-ordination and co-operation between Local Aboriginal Lands Councils.
  • Lack of arts professionals across all art forms.

Opportunities

  • Development of cultural tourism.
  • Development of recently established festivals.
  • Aboriginal arts and cultural engagement.
  • Music industry development.
  • Increasing professional development of artists and organisations.
  • Bundian Way (Aboriginal pathway) development.
  • Creative industries skills workshops.
  • Development of new venues.

Threats

  • Ongoing financial support from the participating LGAs.
  • Impact of possible council amalgamations.
  • Increasing competition within the region for limited arts funding.
  • Limited audience with interest in arts and culture.
  • Youth leaving the region for metropolitan.
  • Aging population and low socio-economic profile.

Aboriginal Arts

Aboriginal Population and Language Groups

  • Nearly 3,000 Aboriginal people live in the region (approximately 2.3% of the general area population)
  • The region encompasses 5 Aboriginal Land Councils

South East Arts Aboriginal Arts and Cultural Action Plan, 2012-2015

  • This plan builds on research on Indigenous cultural practice across all 5 of the LGAs represented by SEA and promotes engagement with Aboriginal communities across the region through the development of cultural generators, professional development opportunities and ways for local artists to gain greater access to cultural infrastructure.
  • Price’s Cafe is the first of two pilot projects identified to begin the process of realising this Plan. It is a museum-style exhibition based on an idea by local Aboriginal artist Cheryl Davision and recreates Moruya’s social hub for Aboriginal people in the 1950s and 1960s. The project will be included in the Eurobodalla River of Art Festival 2013.
  • In 2013 an Aboriginal Arts Officer was appointed and is based at the Aboriginal Cultural Centre near Eden.  The position is funded through the Indigenous Culture Support program of the Australian Government’s Office for the Arts.

Festivals

Aboriginal Arts Organisations

  • Kari Yalla Aboriginal Arts Cooperative, Eden
  • Eden-Moneroo Bubberer Gudu museum and performance space, commercial kitchen café Monaroo Bobberrer Gudu, Jigamy
  • Umbarra Cultural Centre, Wallaga Lake